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Events

‘time to reflect’ …. ‘tremendously rewarding’ … ‘I’ve come away with lots of ideas for doing things back at work’

The Museum Ethnographers Group runs a lively and affordable programme of events for its members with a focus on continual professional development. Recent events have included visits to exhibitions at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge and the Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, a training day in undertaking collections research using family and local history resources, a workshop about curating human remains in UK museums and a visit to the Museum of World Cultures (Världskulturmuseet) in Gothenburg, Sweden.

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 Beatrice Blackwood British Columbia 1925 Copyright Pitt Rivers MuseumTo celebrate International Women’s Day, MEG members are invited to the following FREE event.

A guided tour of the exhibition ‘Intrepid Women, fieldwork in action,1910 and 1957’.

11am – 2pm on Friday 8th March, at Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford.

The tour and Q&A session afterwards will be led by the exhibition curators Julia Nicholson and Zena McGreevy. There will also be the opportunity to carry on conversations and network with other MEG members over lunch, we have a room booked, but lunch will not be provided so you are invited to bring a sandwich with you.

If you would like to attend this event, please email me to reserve a place at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Information about the exhibition

This exhibition focuses on six of the Pitt Rivers Museum’s most important female collectors and their fieldwork carried out between 1910 and the late 1950s. It is a unique opportunity to see objects and photographs resulting from their travels, as well as original archival material and film on display for the first time.

Why intrepid? The six ‘intrepid women’ featured in this exhibition undertook ground-breaking fieldwork between 1910 and 1957. All defied conventions for women: some graduated as Oxford-trained anthropologists in a male-dominated academic discipline; all travelled into places ‘ladies’ didn’t go; all lived with people from very different cultures to learn from them. These women were leaders in different ways. Some survived physical hardships in their research: one was nearly thrown overboard on a sea journey and another ventured into literally uncharged parts of New Guinea. One was Māori and became an extraordinary cross-cultural ambassador. Some found that marriage ended their professional career, and one decided against marriage to have a career. All faced significant prejudice from male colleagues, and had difficulty getting the same professional positions and funding that men would have.

For more information on the exhibition and collectors featured please visit: https://www.prm.ox.ac.uk/event/intrepid-women

Maggie Makereti Papukura 1943 Copyright Pitt Rivers Museum

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